Long Delayed Charles River Skatepark Finally Set to be Built in 2013

 

– Staff Writer, BostInno

Yesterday, the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) and the Charles River Conservancy (CRC) finalized a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for construction on the Charles River Skatepark, the long awaited concrete haven for skaters in Boston, which has been an on again, off again project for more than a decade (LACHFSIBWHBAOAOAPFMTAD). Sorry. Going a little crazy with the initials here.

What this means is the skatepark, slated to be located at North Point Park in Cambridge, is finally going to get made, with construction planned to begin in 2013.

The park has been in the works since 2001 and since then, “$2.5 million has been raised for design and construction from a broad range of organizations and individuals including the Lynch Foundation, the City of Cambridge, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the Boston Redevelopment Authority, the Highland Street Foundation, and the Herman and Frieda L. Miller Foundation,” according to a press release.

It adds:

After several years of planning and collaboration, the park will be constructed in East Cambridge, under the ramps of the iconic Leonard Zakim Bridge. Its design concept is based on the input of hundreds of local skaters. The overall landscape design will be coordinated with Education First’s (EF) upcoming project plans, which include a restaurant with waterfront patio as features within a new building for their Hult School of International Business.

“We look forward to seeing the skate park built and thriving,” said (DCR) Commissioner Edward M. Lambert, Jr. “We hope the local community and surrounding region share our excitement and vision of this facility as a world-class amenity once it is completed.”

Once completed, the park will be free for all to use and will accommodate bikers and roller bladers as well as skateboarders.

This is absolutely awesome news. We’ve got some beautiful property here in Boston, but a lot of it is also really fun to skate. The problem there is that skating said property can be destructive. This is typically why the whole “I’m mad and I’m a cop!” vs. “Come on, dude, we’re just having fun on our skateboards!” conflict exists. But skaters in Boston really don’t have anything to call their own.

Now they will. Shred.

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